Fishing

Great Oyster Bay offers one of the best in-shore fisheries in Australia. The Bay abounds with a variety of top class table fish including flathead, Australian salmon, trevally, trumpeter and squid. For the more adventurous, Coles Bay is an excellent base for big game fishing, especially during the autumn when the giant blue fin tuna run. Don’t think about catching them but dolphins are common and whales are often sighted in the winter.

Sea Kayaking

Freycinet National Park is a great place for sea kayaking when the winds and conditions are right. Summer sea breezes can be strong on hot days, so early starts are recommended and it is good to get the latest weather reports before heading out. Most of the paddling is in Great Oyster Bay. The outside coastline of the peninsula is only for experienced paddlers as there are few, if any, take-outs (all cliffs) on the sea-side of the peninsula. Better to go rock climbing!

There is access to all designated wilderness camping areas by sea kayak. By sea kayak it is also possible to reach the magnificent camps on Schouten Island. Most experienced paddlers can paddle to Schouten Island in a day (27 km), with good weather. There is a hut on Schouten Island with a rainwater tank. Good to plan on three-days or more for kayaking trips on the peninsula, and will give you a bit of time to explore the area.

Surfing and Windsurfing

When the winds and swell are right Friendly beaches offers great surfing. Summer sea breezes can also create great windsurfing conditions in Great Oyster Bay and Coles Bay.

Mountain Biking

There are a number of various mountain biking tracks within the park. Some of the tracks are on 4wd tracks and others are single track. The mountain biking tracks are concentrated north of the Hazards and around Friendly Beaches in the National Park and Coles Bay Conservation Area. Seek information from the National Park Visitor Information Centre.

Rock Climbing

Freycinet National Park has a number of great granite climbing areas. The highest concentration of climbs is centred around whitewater wall, sea cliff climbs. There is a climbers camp near whitewater wall, inside the national park. Access is by a 4wd track or vehicle with good clearance. Unfortunately, the climbing guide to Freycinet is currently out-of-print, though there are rumours of it being printed again.

Scenic Drives

A. Cape Tourville –
The 6.4 kilometre road to Cape Tourville leaves from the main road just after the Freycinet Lodge. There are sweeping views along the coast from the lookout at the end of the road. A short circuit walk is available at Cape Tourville, suitable for pushers and wheel chairs with someone strong to push them.

B. The Friendly Beaches –
Spectacular views and miles of unspoiled white sand beaches are the main features of The Friendly Beaches, which were added to the national park in1992. The beaches can be reached via a signposted turnoff on the Coles Bay Road. The National Park Service are upgrading the facilities, which at present are only basic. Gravel roads lead to car parks overlooking the beaches at a couple of points. Some information signs point out interesting features and foot tracks lead to the beaches. Basic camping is permitted at Isaacs Point and Ridge Camp, though there is no fresh water. Isaacs Point also has pit toilets.

Day Walks(short walks)

A. Sleepy Bay – 10 minutes return –

Drive to the signposted turnoff to the left, just past Freycinet Lodge. Stop at the carpark at Sleepy Bay. Gently graded steps lead to the rocky shoreline of Sleepy Bay which, despite its name, often experiences wild and rough seas.

B. Cape Tourville – 500 metre circuit –

Very easy grade with gentle slopes and no steps. One bench. May suit some wheelchair users. The walk offers sweeping 270 degree views of the Freycinet Peninsula, Wineglass Bay, the Tasman Sea, the Nuggets and Friendly Beaches.

C. Little Gravelly Beach, Sleepy Bay – 30 minutes return –

After enjoying the seascape above Sleepy Bay, follow the track that leads to the right. This provides beautiful coastal views before a steep descent to this delightful cove. While the track is easy to follow, it is rough underfoot in places and passes close to some high cliff tops.

D. Wineglass Bay walk – Lookout – 1 1/2 – 2 hours return –

This walk will give you one of Tasmania’s most celebrated views over the beautiful white sands of Wineglass Bay. The track is a short, fairly steep climb to the saddle between Mt Amos and Mt Mayson. From the saddle, a side track leads to a new lookout, with spectacular views over Wineglass Bay. When returning to the carpark, take care on the downhill sections as the loose gravel surface can be slippery.

E. Scenic Lookout, Friendly Beaches – 5 minutes return –

The signposted parking area is just off the Isaacs Point Road. After a short walk to the vantage point you can see uninterrupted views of The Friendly Beaches and its wonderful dune system.

F. Saltwater Lagoon, Friendly Beaches – 40 minutes return –

Follow the signs from the Isaacs Point road south to the carpark at the barrier gate. The walk along an old vehicular track traverses private property and ends at the edge of the Lagoon. The Lagoon abounds with waterfowl, particularly black swans. Return by the same route.

 

Freycinet National Park is a great place for sea kayaking when the winds and conditions are right. Summer sea breezes can be strong on hot days, so early starts are recommended and it is good to get the latest weather reports before heading out. Most of the paddling is in Great Oyster Bay. The outside coastline of the peninsula is only for experienced paddlers as there are few, if any, take-outs (all cliffs) on the sea-side of the peninsula. Better to go rock climbing!

There is access to all designated wilderness camping areas by sea kayak. By sea kayak it is also possible to reach the magnificent camps on Schouten Island. Most experienced paddlers can paddle to Schouten Island in a day (27 km), with good weather. There is a hut on Schouten Island with a rainwater tank. Good to plan on three-days or more for kayaking trips on the peninsula, and will give you a bit of time to explore the area.

Half-day walks

A. Wineglass bay walk – 2 1/2 hours return –

As for walk C, then continue on downhill to this superb bay with its long white sandy beach and crystal clear seas. A further 20 minute walk along the beach to its southern end will give you magnificent views of the Hazards. Return to the carpark via the same route, or make the circuit route described below.

B. Wineglass Bay/Hazards Beach circuit – 4 1/2 hours –

After enjoying the delights of Wineglass Bay you cross the isthmus to Hazards Beach. To get there turn right from the Wineglass Bay track just before the Wineglass Bay Beach. After half an hour of flat walking, you reach Hazards Beach. Turn right and follow the beach to its northern end.Here you join up with another track that follows the coastline for about 5 1/2 kilometres around the base of Mt Mayson before reaching the carpark. This is about an 11km walk.

C. Hazards Beach – 5 to 6 hours return –

After reaching Hazards Beach walk south along this lengthy shore. You are following in the footsteps of the Aboriginal people who once lived here, as is evident from the numerous shell middens in the dunes along the beach.

D. Mt Amos – 3 hours return –

Mt Amos is part of the range of granite mountains, known as the Hazards, which dominate Coles Bay. The track to the summit is steep and strenuous, but walkers are rewarded with panoramic views. This walk is not recommended for the elderly or young children. Walkers must be equipped with robust walking shoes or boots as the track climbs steeply over sheets of bare rock and can be slippery, especially after rain. Caution should be exercised on this track.

Longer/Overnight Walks

Some of Freycinet’s more remote and beautiful areas can be visited by taking a long day or overnight walk. Contact the park office for advice about the availability of water, the condition of tracks and any special equipment that may be needed. The Freycinet National Park map and notes is useful for all the longer walks in the park.

The Hazards Beach/Cooks Beach/Wineglass Bay Circuit:

is a popular three-day walk (or longer if you spend some leisurely days on the beach). Campsites for overnight walkers are situated at Wineglass Bay, Hazards, Cooks and Bryans Beaches.
Water is normally available in water tanks at Cooks Beach and in Jimmy’s Creek between Mt Graham and Cooks Beach. Less reliable sources can also be found in Laguna Creek at Hazards Beach and where the track crosses the top of Grahams Creek. There is no water at Wineglass Bay or Bryans Beach. Please check with the ranger regrading water availability before commencing overnight trips.